Quality Time in "The Home Stretch"

Quality Time in "The Home Stretch"
Posted on 02/21/2018
Mrs. Pezley

Quality Time in “The Home Stretch”


Children in Mexico Public Schools and other school districts will soon enter the fourth quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. It is difficult to admit we are already heading into what some consider “The Home Stretch”. This school year has went by in a flash! Entering the last months of school, it is easy to slip into a mentality of, “We’re almost finished. We can take it easy now.”


Even though the school year will soon be in the final quarter, there is still so much learning taking place along with other demands such as testing. Students will continue to grow in reading, writing, and math skills each day. It is important that kids get enough rest in order to be prepared for the demands of the school day, testing, and extracurricular activities.


In reality, the end of school may seem most difficult because of the emotional exhaustion that so many involved with school feel. Students, parents, teachers, volunteers, and administration all feel the strains. Learning involves effort from all involved, and after three quarters of hard work, the last months of school are no different. There are, however, strategies that can help recharge your batteries and encourage success!


As summer nears and the weather warms, outdoor activities increase. Time outside, Vitamin D, and exercise are good for the whole body: physically, mentally, and emotionally. As schedules become even busier, don’t forget to spend quality time with your child. Small gestures can go a long way, so go for walks, cheer at the ballpark, explore nature, or stop for a picnic. Short moments can make the memories of a lifetime. These quality moments encourage connection, security, and confidence in your child.


Longer daylight hours make maintaining a schedule difficult. Falling into the habit of playing outside a bit later is easy to do, but establishing the importance of an appropriate bedtime is just as important now as it was at the beginning of the school year. In fact, the demands on students in the late school year may make the importance of a healthy schedule even more pertinent. Make heading inside earlier a positive experience by creating some rituals and routines that include quality time with your child. This could involve preparing dinner together as a pair of chefs, telling each other about your least favorite and favorite parts of the day while eating, reading together, or just snuggling on the couch with your feet up for a short time before getting those needed zzzz’s.   


Getting up and out the door on time in the morning is just as important. Starting the day without the feeling of rush and anxiety can set your child up for a successful school day. Although not everyone’s favorite time of day, mornings can be another great opportunity to squeeze in time together. Whether you jam to your favorite song while getting ready, sit down for breakfast, or talk about what the day might bring on the ride to the school, a routine is important. Your child’s school day most likely starts with a review of the schedule for the day, including any special events. It is important for students to be a part of this so they can be prepared for the day. It can be hard for late students to enter a class that is already underway as they miss needed instruction and for elementary students reading and math generally start early in the school day. Testing season is also nearing, with test times beginning early. These are each reasons it is important for students to get to school on time.


This is a crucial time of the school year for your student, and like many parents, you may feel like it is one of your busiest. Remember you are a very big piece of the puzzle for their success.  You are most likely your child’s favorite part of the day and their biggest fan. Encourage them by spending time together and providing stability and love during a time that may become stressful due to busy schedules, testing, and many other factors. Keep up the stellar work, parents! You DO make a difference!